Publishing, Slice of life

Turning the Tables: A Word Exploration

I recently completed a word-research project based upon the word table. The final product was a 1000-word argument that explored modern usage of this everyday word. Here is the abbreviated version.

. . . .

Table. The first thing that comes to mind upon hearing that word is a long, flat, wooden board, supported by four legs, standing in a dining room. It is loaded with memories of familial laughter, smells of good food, and the occasional spread of work-related papers across its surface. It is a mundane noun; the furniture that it describes exists in many forms, in many cultures, for many purposes. It is a common everyday object. And yet, it has become more.

We know words matter, but even the simplest of words can have a wide variety of meanings. 

The object this noun describes has become a gathering place. A place for discourse, learning, argument, and unity. It supports culture—that of culinary delights, entertaining games, artistic endeavors, and political debate—so much so that table has become a verb as well. We lay our thoughts on the table, and sweep them aside by tabling them. We turn the tables on our opponents and come to the table when we’re ready to participate in discussion again. Motions that are laid upon the table can also be negotiated at a metaphorical one. Even the shape of the table has historically represented social position. The legendary “knights of the round table” were each equally revered as authoritative figures, while the head of the table is still revered as a position of authority. All these meanings and nuances reside in the five letters that describe the four-legged object.

Oxford Dictionary defines table as, “A piece of furniture with a flat top and one or more legs, providing a level surface for eating, writing, or working at.” Besides this primary definition, I personally used table as a verb, meaning to delay an issue or discussion. Oxford dictionary attributes this definition to American English.

This would explain my confusion when I came across a BBC news article which used table in a completely different context. Earlier this month, the British Parliament “tabled a motion” of no confidence against UK Prime Minister Theresa May. Why would they delay a motion when they clearly meant to move forward with the vote of no confidence? This one word seemingly contradicted the point of the entire article, and dramatically hampered my understanding of it. After a quick Google search, I came across a helpful discussion post that explained the British-English definition of the word, which is to “Present formally for discussion or consideration at a meeting.”

Because words can have dramatic variations in different dialects, we must carefully consider words as they are spoken within their given contexts.

Which form of the word is correct? The answer is, both of them. It makes sense that the phrase, “tabled the issue” means to present an issue for review within British English, especially since Parliament uses table as a procedural term. “Tabling is the act of formally putting forward a question, a motion or an amendment in the Commons or the Lords.” Even Americans will occasionally refer to “laying it all on the table.” As tables have historically been a resting place for objects, it is equally understandable that the common American-English version of the word means, to postpone the review of an issue.

So what was the point of researching this common, everyday word? The usage of this table demonstrates even the simplest of words can have a wide variety of meanings across different dialects. Such word variances should not be taken for granted. It is important to maintain curiosity about language, and an awareness about the nuances of different word usages. It is a fact that one word, when heard out of context, can lead to confusion. Thus, the importance of context cannot be overstressed. To operate ethically within our world, we must carefully consider words as they are spoken within their given contexts, before jumping to misguided conclusions.

 

Publishing

An Editing Philosophy

I recently established my personal editing philosophy through free writing. What’s your writing/editing philosophy?

 

Editing is the art of shaping ideas. The art of the idea has already been produced by the author, but the editor must respectfully review the art, frame the ideas, polish the rough edges, and make the author’s voice shine.

As an editor, I am the invisible helper shining a light on the author’s story. Everyone’s voice is different. I don’t want to take over an author’s work. I want to explore the words created by unique imaginations and help them express the truth of their story without impeding. I have a deep appreciation of the written word and the plethora of ideas represented by many different authors. I revel in a well-formed sentence and equally relish the moments when the rules of grammar are cleverly broken.

I am passionate in my editorial aims for unique perfection within text. The rules of the written word are as detailed as they are evolving. My goal is to collaborate with talented authors to develop their manuscripts into polished works of art.

Politics

Declarations of John Hancock

This copy of the U.S. Declaration of Independence is displayed within modest frames against a rough brick wall. The towering expanse of a stairwell dwarfs the display and makes it appear out-of-place. And yet, it is this simplicity that makes the copy of the Declaration so intriguing… along with the fact that is has been signed recently.

Look closely.

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Among the names of our founding fathers and underneath the bold signature of John Hancock, multitudes of individuals have added their own John Hancock. The ink of some signatures have faded to pale indentations, only to be scribbled over by other signatures. Some of the signatures are written in jest, such as Mad Poet and the paw print followed by (Snoop!). But others have added their actual names. This document of immense national and historical meaning continues to inspire. The signatures of the 21st century mingle with those of the 18th.

*Please note: I do not support graffiti or any type of defacement of public or private property.*